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Life Coaching, Observations, Reflections, Things that make you go hmmmmm

Category Archives: Honour

Cowardly and Illegal

Cowardly and Illegal

One of the community friendlies stopped to speak with me in a coffee spot. We know each other to smile and nod. The personable “I know you as part of my community” stuff that personable people do.

It was related to me that this individual had their bicycle stolen. Three locks cut right off the bike rack of their car which was in their condo parking spot and stolen.

I was being asked to do something if I saw the bike. I noted that risking a confrontation could lead to violence and it isn’t worth it over a bike.

We talked about policing in Toronto. Naturally enough, this person wasn’t pleased and to a degree, understandable. This person went further with their distaste for the police. I was rebutting with what Toronto’s finest must cope with in violent crime among other things.

The individual went on to tell me they were going to a 50th anniversary party that night.

The party was for an individual who was marking 50 years as a draft dodger.

There were a goodly number of low frequency words used by me to illustrate my disgust. None of the words I used were curses.

The individual brought up the politics and I cut that short with the politics of the Viet Nam war are a different argument and I don’t disagree with the futility geo and political of that police action that became a war.

Dodging the draft is an absolute hot button for me. You are a coward.

There is no argument “for” the dodging the draft and I told the individual so. I explained my reasoning, directly.

There is a level of service in my family. The small piece I have is just a scratch compared to others in my family and the good people who serve and have stood in service to our countries. Yes countries, I have American family who have served.

Along with being draft dodgers, they’re illegals. I have zero tolerance for both. Draft dodgers are also illegal aliens, period end of story. Neither will ever be welcomed by me in my Canada. I’m far from the minority on this one.

It is my position that all illegals should be returned to their country of origin so naturally that includes draft dodgers.

There is a status of “Conscientious Objector”.  The “CO” was used by Cassius Clay and you probably know him better as Muhammad Ali. You can if you care to, research what it cost Ali to take the position he did.

These are all good pieces.

My Time as a Vietnam War-era Conscientious Objector

A Conscientious Objector in a War Zone

Muhammad Ali: the world’s ‘greatest’ conscientious objector

The point is that these individuals didn’t turn their backs to their country and run!

I also said to the individual I was speaking with that the person celebrating his 50th anniversary of the dodge is a coward.  There were avenues and I fucking grant you that Leavenworth isn’t exactly palatable but…

G.R. Hambley ©
July 09, 2018

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My Talisman of Life & Art

My Talisman of Life & Art

I was given what you’re looking at as a Birthday Gift a number of years ago. I’ve carried it ever since.

Someone I know somewhat closely was in a quandary. In a head-space that someone else laid on them.

That my friends is what we call an “Emotionally Controlling Act”. If you’ve read enough of my stuff, you know that behaviour does not fly with me!

I took my Talisman out of my pocket and did a few shots. I looked at it a few ways. Looked at it in the colour version you see and desaturated to Grey Scale or B&W if you like.

The Grey Scale is starker more statement than feeling. Go ahead and try it for yourself.

I sent the someone I’m somewhat close to the colour version. It’s warmer, more embracing. The warmth and embracing is what I believed was needed.

The Talisman

My gift was very well received and the one I’m somewhat close to will be exhibiting.

I’m glad.

G.R. Hambley ® December 07, 2017

A Marine Passes

A Marine Passes

At 1:58 am on 15 May, 2017 an American Marine passed on. To some that man was and will always be, more than a Marine.

Being a United States Marine didn’t define what the man was. Being a Marine was a part of what made up the whole man.

The man had a tough go before the irony that is the illness that eventually took his life got him. Irony in abundance. He fought the good fight with dignity and grace. Never gave up. I’m sure he thought of it as we all would in that situation. He carried on out of a love of life and family. The duty he believed was owed to himself and his family.

No one would have faulted him had he chose to move along to the next plain of his own volition. He endured that much. He cared that much to soldier on.

This man was given the last rites in Vietnam. He was subjected to derision at the very least for having gone to Vietnam when he returned home. He came home with issues and worked on those issues.

Much later on in life, he was stricken with cancer and the belief is that “Agent Orange” was the culprit. There’s your irony. It took his own country to do what the enemy couldn’t.

A number of years ago that man and I were out somewhere when I was down in Rhode Island working out some of my own issues. I do remember it was winter and damn cold.

We were walking up to the door after getting home and I asked him, “Knowing what you know, would you do it again”. This is one of those you had to be there moments. The man knew my question didn’t come out of anything but interest in how he felt and what he thought.

“Knowing what you know, would you do it again” and the reply was, “My country called”.

Not another word was spoken between us. We both knew and understood what was in the answer.

Three words made up a “you had to be there” moment. I cannot convey everything that was in those three words. You had to see the man when he said, “My country called”. I could tell you about it so you could see and understand. I can’t write what I saw that day because no amount of words is going to be able to describe that moment properly.

I spoke of that moment a couple times with people in conversation because it fit with what we were talking about. I never told anyone about this encounter that is close to the man. The conversation was between him and me and except for those few instances, that is where it stayed.

Toughest man I ever knew. One of the best men I’ve ever known too.

Semper Fi, definitely. Character, absolutely.

Francis “Frank” Connors is survived by my cousin Karen, son Eli, daughters Shannon, Sandra and Michelle. Grandchildren, more family, others who love him and by what is now, a grateful nation.

Gary Hambley, May 15, 2017